JOHN WALLACE WHEATLEY Spent the Morning Watching TV and Looking Through My Phone.

John Wallace Wheatley
Spent the Morning Watching TV and Looking Through My Phone
Self-released

Intelligent Classic and Soulful Pop Music of the Grown-Up Kind.

Suburban Dirts frontman John Wheatley takes a step aside from the acoustic Americana of the SD’s epic album, “I Want Blood” and launches full on into a self-effacing, philosophical, witty white Soul nee Classic Pop collection, on this very aptly titled (for the times in which we’re living) solo release.
Opener “Cemetery Smokes II” is one of two versions of the song on the album – the first version – which is number #2 – is very Style Councilesque musically and more tongue in cheek than version one (which is midway through the album ….. kids today, eh?) and is darker and a bit more like Sensational Alex Harvey in its storytelling tone.
Both versions were inspired by JWW finding a big grave slab with his name on – and the two versions reflect the different ways that one could take that…
“Heartstrings” fits well after the opener in musical style and Andy Fairclough’s Mellotron punctuates a soulful backbeat tale of phonies – and being a phony one’s self.
“Last Man Standing” – it seems to be a song title in fashion these days
My friends are all busy – or under the thumb” sums up the mid-paced cathartic ballad.
Again, the Philly-soul sound is prominent, yet mixed in with a bit of Mott the Hoople too – sounds a bit strange – but it genuinely works well.
The tempo lifts with “Neurotic Dancer” – but there’s a clear dissonance between the catchy melody and the fact that “you make me feel like a neurotic dancer”….
“In the End” (which comes halfway through) is a late-period Beatles/Beach Boys sounding slice of reassurance
it’s going to be alright in the end”…although JWW doesn’t sound totally sure in the melancholy musical way that those sentiments are delivered – the eternal pessimist can’t shake the fear but there’s more than enough positivity.
Following the aforementioned second/first take on “Cemetery Smokes;” “I’ve Only Just Realised” is reminiscent of the band Jellyfish with its 60’s harmonies and stop-start rhythms and classic pop sensibilities – lyrically, again there’s a glorious incongruity between the confident music and edgy, questioning lyrics.
“World War III” continues in a similar musical and lyrical vein with
She’s been told too many times she’s emotionally dead,” not being the sort of lyric that will find its way onto chirpy commercial radio, but will hopefully find its way into the ears and hearts of those who will appreciate its depth and appeal.
“The Singularity” starts as a piano ballad and then becomes an epic stomper quite rightly calls for us to get “the fuck out of here” in a rant against commercialism and “leaders who don’t want to lead”
and many others of society and culture’s ills.
Listen to this and you’ll be double-nodding – at the sentiments and the melody too.
Closer “The Morning Never Came” is a musically trippy rumination on the meaning of life, about regrets and the ultimate realisation that
none of this was meaningless
and it runs the gamut of feeling and musical styles before ending in randomness – quite deliberately.
This is quite a gem of an album – fans of 90’s band Jellyfish and their like will adore this and there are shades of classic stylings all over the place, yet used in both original and cohesive ways to create an album that will withstand a serious amount of re-listens.
In a just world, John Wallace Wheatley’s music would be listened to in a million bedrooms, on millions of sets of headphones and streamed in supermarkets.
People – make it so.

Review by Nick Barber
Released November 27th 2020

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https://johnwallacewheatley.bandcamp.com/

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